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2 May 2012

Recording Recognition
David Denby of The New Yorker writes in his latest contribution, "Ten Perfect Orchestral Recordings": "I don’t know that perfection is of the greatest importance in music-making. Spirit, power, phrasing, tempo, expressiveness — all these things matter more than note-perfect execution."
Apparently the Philharmonic has those elements down to a science, as Mr. Denby ranked a 1985 recording ofMahler’s Symphony No. 7, led by none other than Leonard Bernstein, as one of the top recordings of all time. To experience this for yourself, you can purchase the recording on ArkivMusic or Amazon and follow along on Lenny’s score, courtesy of our Digital Archives.

Recording Recognition

David Denby of The New Yorker writes in his latest contribution, "Ten Perfect Orchestral Recordings": "I don’t know that perfection is of the greatest importance in music-making. Spirit, power, phrasing, tempo, expressiveness — all these things matter more than note-perfect execution."

Apparently the Philharmonic has those elements down to a science, as Mr. Denby ranked a 1985 recording ofMahler’s Symphony No. 7, led by none other than Leonard Bernstein, as one of the top recordings of all time. To experience this for yourself, you can purchase the recording on ArkivMusic or Amazon and follow along on Lenny’s score, courtesy of our Digital Archives.

Notes

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